The Art of Mastering Designs

How to Learn from Past Logo Failures

Logos are tricky, and they can either make or break your business. Many businesses utilize logo as a form of showing professionalism, for branding, and catching their customers’ attention. In this article, we won’t be highlighting about the famous logos available and used by famous brands, but instead, we will be dealing with the best logo fails. A poorly designed logo can actually catch the eyes of consumers for the incorrect reasons.

In 2012, the Summer Olympic Games was threatened by Iran to boycott the said event because the logo used “ZION” which also refers to a Jewish holy state and the whole country became upset. If you make a logo, it is best to have it tested by an audience before it is published. Another logo fail when adopted by a new company is the bloody Sherwin Williams color your world logo, wherein one might think it was some sort of warning about ills of violence and war. This logo has been existing since 1905 and it is a sign of cutting-edge surrealism, remaining a classic symbol for generations, but a new company adopting this logo may appear to be offensive. What we can learn about Sherwin Williams logo is that any logo cutting edge today, maybe a classic logo tomorrow or mildly offensive in the future. The controversial Pepsi “bloat” logo reminds us that not all cartoon logos are effective, most especially if it brings the opposite results. Of course, the Pepsi company did not intend to remind their customers that drinking soda is bad for the health, but they missed testing the impact of their “bloat” logo wherein it just looks like a large person wearing a shirt that is too small for his belly. It is best to have your logo tested and reviewed by different focus groups so you can assess its possible impact on consumers, most especially your target audience.

In 2010, Gap, a famous clothing company, changed their classic logo that was a huge mistake on their part. In 2010, Gap changed the classy Spire Regular typeface designed by Anne Pomeroy into Helvetica for an attempt to emulate the success of its competitor, but the typeface and little gradient square did not appeal to fashion designers and critics as it appears like a printed blurry JPEG and called it a logo. Gap went back to their classic logo and did not look back. Although black metal effect logos are cool, you should not adopt this theme if your business is not in line with body piercing, tattoos, motorcycles, or electronics, be unique and your logo will stand out from others.

Categories: Arts & Entertainment